16304 Private Samuel Ogden

9th(Service)Battalion

Devonshire Regiment

1st July 1916

Born in Heywood Lancashire in 1895.

His parents were Edmund Ogden(1857-1914 and

Sarah Jane Bennion(20/12/1855-1933).They married on 18/11/1876.

Samuel had a brother Thomas(1880-1953) and

5 sisters; Leah(1877-0/04/1971),Harriett(19/11/1883),

Alice(25/07/1886-31/08/1955),

Francis(09/10/1888-07/03/1977) and

Mary Ann (13/03/1893-11/01/1978).

In the 1901 census, the family were recorded as living at 35 William Henry Street, Heywood, Lancashire.

Edmund was employed as a cotton spinner.

In the 1911 census,the family were shown to have moved to 63 Rose Hill Street,Heywood Lancashire.

Edmund had retired from cotton spinning and Samuel was now employed as a weaver in a cotton mill.

He enlisted in Rochdale in April 1915 and his date of disembarkation into France was on 19/10/1915.

He was killed in action on 01/07/1916.

He was awarded the 1914-1915 Star,The 1914-1918 British War and Allied Victory medals.

His mother was awarded a pension of 5/- a week from 06/02/1917.    

Heywood AdvertiserFriday 21 July 1916 - “Official Intimation has been received of the death of

Private Samuel Ogden of the Devon Regiment, who was killed in action on July 1st. He was the son of

Mrs Ogden of 63 Rose Hill Street. Private Ogden joined the army in April 1915 and went to France last October. Formerly he worked at the Plum Mill, Heywood. He was 21 years of age and was associated with

Bury New Road School and Chapel.

Heywood AdvertiserFriday 28 July 1916

 

Private Samuel Ogden – of the Devonshire Regiment, who was killed in action on July 1st. He was the son of Mrs. Ogden of       63 Rose Hill Street, Heywood. Private Ogden joined the army in April 1915 and went to France last October. Formerly he worked at the Plum Mill, Heywood. He was 21 years of age and was associated with Bury New Road school and chapel, and his name is on the schools roll of honour.

The Rev. E.C. Crosse, chaplain to the battalion, in the course of a letter to Mrs. Ogden , says “He died nobly, doing his duty to his King and country, and it was mainly owing to the willing sacrifice of him and others who fought with him that the troops in this command succeeded in winning  the great victory that they did on that day. Though you must feel his loss bitterly, one cannot but be proud of those who have laid down their lives in such a cause. He entered into his well-earned rest, and pray God may comfort you in your loss.”

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